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Tagged With: Gomersal

Happily ever after …?

It may be a long way off but how and where to end a story can be a dilemma.  For me, recently, it has often been the least satisfactory part of otherwise excellent books I have read, fact or fiction.  Now, Dickens knew how to end a story that left the reader feeling satisfied, giving … Continue reading »

Categories: How we write, Men of God, and of Commerce | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Love and marriage in 1794

Two brothers, James and William Burnley had a double wedding on Thursday 11 December 1794 in the Anglican parish church of St Peters, Birstall.   James was 40 years old – rather late by the average for the time – and his brother William 10 years younger.  Whatever had led up to this joyous occasion, it … Continue reading »

Categories: 18th Century, Men of God, and of Commerce | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Inventions and wealth in the late 18th century

How was William Burnley & Sons able to increase both its woollen cloth output and its profits? (See previous post for its beginnings.)  New machinery, which made labour very much more productive, had first been applied in the cotton industry.  It migrated across the Pennines into the Calder valley, where cotton and woollen mills co-existed, … Continue reading »

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The (un) mitred bishop of Yorkshire

Those charismatic preachers of the 18th century religious revival, John Wesley, George Whitefield etc were succeeded in the 19th century by other men of considerable repute, albeit addressing established congregations rather than outdoors, nationwide to crowds of thousands.  James Parsons (1799-1877) pastor at Lendal Congregational Chapel in York was occasionally in the pulpit at Grove … Continue reading »

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Disease, disability and death

My sisters and brother have little interest in our family history.  My brother, a doctor, was only curious to know what they died of.  Finding that out before 1837, when death certificates were introduced, is chancy, though death notices in local newspapers are occasionally specific. Mary Susannah Burnley (nee Milner) 1804-1831, Thomas Burnley’s first wife, … Continue reading »

Categories: Men of God, and of Commerce | Tags: , , , | 8 Comments